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Thread: Fireplace insert

  1. #1
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    Default Fireplace insert

    School me

    I'm thinking about installing an insert in an existing masonry fireplace and chimney. Fireplace is non-standard; open on front and right side, supported by round column (think steel pipe) on right front corner. It is a bitch to maintain a proper draft and keep from smoking up the house so it is rarely used.

    For lack of the right word, how is the exhaust "plumbed" from the insert through the existing flue and up the chimney?

    If I can find an insert to fit, I assume I'll still need to close up that right side of the fireplace somehow. How?

    Who does this kind of work in Columbia when I come to that conclusion?

  2. #2
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    take a picture

  3. #3
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    And Bart Fireside in Cola is probably your best bet to take this on for you. There are others that you can research. Here's a link to gas fireplace specialist in your area. Many people can do this but I'd stick with the NFI certified group of people. It's a small group that stay up-to-date with any and all things fireplace related.

    https://www.nficertified.org/search-...st&distance=25

  4. #4
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    I used to be a sweep in another life. Inserts need to be cleaned a LOT more often than open fireplaces, as they don't burn as completely. Second, you may need a flu liner or other means to exhaust the smoke. What kind of fireplace do you have now. If it is a prefab, not all prefabs can handle an insert. Most masonary cement fireplaces can, unless they have interior structural defects in the flu. Then probably triple wall pipe may be required.
    RIP Kelsey "Bigdawg" Cromer
    12-26-98 12-1-13

    If love could have saved you, you would have lived forever.

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  5. #5
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    Buck Stove Pool and Spa in Newberry had much more competent sales people for me over Bart Fireside and they were cheaper. I ended up buying my insert directly from the manufacturer. I was wanted a zero clearance EPA fireplace insert due to the fact I couldn’t install full masonry in my house. I ended up with a Osburn stratford from https://www.osburnwoodstoves.com/default.asp. I get about 6-7 hours burn time on a load of wood. It was fairly expensive buying the stove and the stainless vent pipe. But with that being said it heats my whole downstairs and my heat only came on last winter when we had that extreme cold at the end of December. It will pay for itself in a couple of winters.

    As far as the how it vents. The stove goes in the fireplace, the steel pipe goes up the chimney, then a cap goes on the top of the stove. You would have more options on inserts due to the fact you’ve got a masonry fireplace.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by LabLuvR View Post
    I used to be a sweep in another life. Inserts need to be cleaned a LOT more often than open fireplaces, as they don't burn as completely. Second, you may need a flu liner or other means to exhaust the smoke. What kind of fireplace do you have now. If it is a prefab, not all prefabs can handle an insert. Most masonary cement fireplaces can, unless they have interior structural defects in the flu. Then probably triple wall pipe may be required.
    I read it as he wanted to go with gas, either way, NFI is the way to go.

  7. #7
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    Want to burn wood.

    I found a deal on an old "Oak Stove" insert by "Oak MFG Co." from "Marsh*** NC" Google turns up a Round Oak Stove that appears to be a different company and an Oak Mfg Co that made gumball machines.

    I doubt that unit would be the right way to go, but it inspired me to research and figure out what could work.

  8. #8
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    I don't know if they still make them but buck stove used to be one of the top Woodstoves sold. If you get a chimney sweep make certain to get with someone who is certified.
    RIP Kelsey "Bigdawg" Cromer
    12-26-98 12-1-13

    If love could have saved you, you would have lived forever.

    Missing you my great friend.


  9. #9
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    They still make buck stoves. They are still good stoves. You can buy used ones at the store in Newberry but I’d look hard at the new stoves. They will cost more than the used ones but they are much more efficient than they used to be. Either an used stove or a new stove will be much more efficient than a fireplace.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beauregard View Post
    School me

    I'm thinking about installing an insert in an existing masonry fireplace and chimney. Fireplace is non-standard; open on front and right side, supported by round column (think steel pipe) on right front corner. It is a bitch to maintain a proper draft and keep from smoking up the house so it is rarely used.

    For lack of the right word, how is the exhaust "plumbed" from the insert through the existing flue and up the chimney?

    If I can find an insert to fit, I assume I'll still need to close up that right side of the fireplace somehow. How?

    Who does this kind of work in Columbia when I come to that conclusion?



    Let me guess, 60s ranch style home? Your best bet might be ventless gas logs for heat, doubt youll find any thing to fit that setup in a wood burning insert.
    Firebox will likely be too small if you had the side bricked in.

  11. #11
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    My dad had a buck stove installed in his fireplace in the late 70's. That thing is still going and will run you out of the house when it gets really hot.

  12. #12
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    Buck stove, the reason I vowed as an adult to not have a wood burning fireplace! Dad decided he was going to heat the house with one and I got to fill up the wood box after school.
    Low country redneck who moved north

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    Quote Originally Posted by mudflat View Post
    Buck stove, the reason I vowed as an adult to not have a wood burning fireplace! Dad decided he was going to heat the house with one and I got to fill up the wood box after school.
    I loaded, unloaded, split, and stacked wood, then hauled wood to the house from the wood pile, and ashes out of the fireplace growing up. I swore I would never heat a house with wood, once I grew up. Then I got married, moved into a 100+ year old house, and became responsible for utilities. I burn lots of wood again.
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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by charlie horse View Post
    Let me guess, 60s ranch style home? Your best bet might be ventless gas logs for heat, doubt youll find any thing to fit that setup in a wood burning insert.
    Firebox will likely be too small if you had the side bricked in.
    fireplace.jpg
    1954

  15. #15
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    by the looks of that fireplace no wonder it smokes your house up

  16. #16
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    Call the folks at Stoll Fireplace in Abbeville. They can likely build just what you need.

    https://www.stollindustries.com/heating-solutions/
    I don't need my name in the marquee lights....

  17. #17
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    Ventless gas. The heat will help warm the house instead of going up the chimney.


    Last edited by Catdaddy; Today at 09:52 AM.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by LabLuvR View Post
    I used to be a sweep in another life. Inserts need to be cleaned a LOT more often than open fireplaces, as they don't burn as completely. Second, you may need a flu liner or other means to exhaust the smoke. What kind of fireplace do you have now. If it is a prefab, not all prefabs can handle an insert. Most masonary cement fireplaces can, unless they have interior structural defects in the flu. Then probably triple wall pipe may be required.
    Now we know what your problem is, Ball Sack Cancer. Better know as Chimney sweeps' carcinoma. Wash that old nut sack, Lab.
    I seen a horse fly... I even seen a house fly... But I be done seen 'bout ev'rything when I see a elephant fly.

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