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Thread: New proposed lower saluda trout refs

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by cajunwannabe View Post
    I believe that FERC relicensing has aided in mandating a reliable CFS in the Saluda river to maintain a certain amount of dissolved oxygen to support a trout fishery. I don't believe there is much evidence supporting the spawning of hatchery fish tho. The spawning striper run, believe it or not....largemouth bass and river otters, herons, etc lead to massive predation of Saluda river stocked trout. It's a put and take fishery and holdover fish are very, very few but some have grown into very nice trout.

    Barbless / catch and release is a nice idea and worth a try to protect large holdover fish and may be worth a try to increase numbers of holdover fish. I'd bet nearly all Trout Unlimited members that fish that area in mention practice catch and release already.
    SCE&G has implemented most of the measures implemented in the license agreement (improving dissolved oxygen and flow characteristics) while waiting over 9 years for the new license to be issued. FERC awaits a biological opinion from NMFS on diadromous fish before issuing the new license. Gotta love the federal government.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spur hunter View Post
    Beauregard,
    Would weir dams and a controlled CFS release help things any on making it a reproductive stretch of river? I haven't fished there but my understanding is the outflow is huge or near nothing. I see it as having a great potential though.
    See here for Saluda River flows: https://waterdata.usgs.gov/sc/nwis/u...62,72137,62614

    SCE&G also has a system to alert users to changing flow. https://www.sceg.com/about-us/lower-saluda-river You can subscribe to phone alerts.

    Most fish like relatively stable flows for spawning. There are a few specialists that target rising or falling water. Rising water especially can be a cue for some river species. The big thing for rainbow trout in a situation like this is to have enough flow to allow access to suitable habitat, but not so much that eggs or larvae would be washed out of the redd.

    Relicensing information here: http://www.saludahydrorelicense.com/

    Settlement Agreement gives info on measures intended to improve all kinds of fish and wildlife habitat. For example, flows a little higher for the striper run.

    The IFIM report tells you where the good habitat is and how much flow is needed to make it best quality.

    Rainbows do have a little natural reproduction. I agree with Bogster that it is unlikely to ever be significant enough to really reduce or eliminate stocking.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by BOGSTER View Post
    My personal theory is that in this particular river scenario, bigger trout key in on the plentiful shad and other baitfish washed down from Murray rather than spending their days sipping blue winged olives, and that’s why the bigger fish are caught by striper fishermen rather than fly fishers.
    Agree here. Trout in this river grow pretty well because of good, relatively constant temperature year round and resulting food availability. Once the few fish that are not predated get big enough to switch to piscivory (herring and threadfin), they can pack on the pounds and become real trophies. Current regulations allow harvest of one fish over 16 inches out of the allowable five per day.

  4. #24
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    All trout pretty much switch over to being predators when they reach size to do so. No difference in that river from any other. They will still eat insects on occasion though, heavy hatch etc. I would have thought brown trout spawning would have been more favorable than the rainbows.
    Worship the LORD, not HIS creation.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by BOGSTER View Post
    ...My personal theory is that in this particular river scenario, bigger trout key in on the plentiful shad and other baitfish washed down from Murray rather than spending their days sipping blue winged olives, and thatís why the bigger fish are caught by striper fishermen rather than fly fishers.
    The only time any baitfish come from Murray is when they open the emergency flood gates, and those end up as floaters. Rockfish were sipping dead herring like trout eating bugs a few years ago when that happened. No shad or herring survive going through the dam. Put on some goggles and swim and you will see how few baitfish and even bream/bass there are in that river, other than close to the confluence. The big trout definitely turn opportunistic though.

    This catch and release section is being pushed for by TU so their "private" runs don't get fished out. Heybos and Mexicans keeping stringers full of trout will clean out a set of rapids in a hurry. Plenty of fish make it past 12", and it seems like it's happening more often recently, or maybe everyone is posting more pictures of it online. It would be neat to see it happen even more often, but spawning fish won't be the cause.

  6. #26
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    If there aren't many holdovers, then why can a select few fishermen catch a good number of trout over 20 inches in there? Just curious, I get to see the big trout pics but don't really have a dog in the fight.
    Last edited by BRR; 02-09-2018 at 10:19 AM.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by BRR View Post
    If there aren't many holdovers, then why can a select few fishermen catch a good number of trout over 20 inches in there? Just curious, I get to see the big trout pics but don't really have a dog in the fight.

    SCNDR tells us about 1.3% make it through the first year. I would call that "not many." There are some good fish though.

    Once a fish reaches that size threshold where predation vulnerability significantly drops off, maybe 16", its annual mortality rate falls too. Think about it this way, numbers are guesses: The present population is made up of 2017 stocking holdovers (n1=200) + 2016 survivors (n2=150) + 2015 (n3=100) + 2014 (n4=75) and so on. There may be only 200 2017 holdovers, but the population of trophy fish might be more like 525.

  8. #28
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    WNM - I see good schools of shad nearly every time I fish. In multiple locations.
    There are more Bait sized redbreasts along the grassy edges and log jams than you realize.

    BRR - there are certain sets of rapids and holes that hold big trout all the time and those that know about em can catch em with consistency. The trophy hunters release em so I’m certain fish are caught multiple times by different fishermen.
    Be proactive about improving public waterfowl habitat in South Carolina. It's not going to happen by itself, and our help is needed. We have the potential to winter thousands of waterfowl on public grounds if we fight for it.

  9. #29
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    When I was stationed in CT I got permission from the head of their GW's to hunt and fish his land. He had a significant stretch of a VERY popular river as one of his borders. TU guys had locked up all the access from the other side. I cannot begin to put to words this guy's hatred for the TU guys. Because of this he told me by all means to use his property to access the river with only one stipulation; I HAD to use spinning tackle, live bait and couldn't release ANY legal fish. It was all done to piss off the TU guys, It was fucking awesome! He even told me to bring as many friends as I wanted to, but they had to abide by the same rules, lol.

    We would catch our limits then cook them on the bank and watch the TU guys fume.

    Killed the hell outta grouse on that place too, but I wasn't allowed to bring others there to hunt.

  10. #30
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    The only thing worse than turkey hunters are trout fishermen.

  11. #31
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    No I don't agree. It seems it's those who for some odd reason (or insecurity) who simply can't stand to see a conversation going on here and just have to chime in with smart ass remarks.
    Last edited by Spur hunter; 02-10-2018 at 05:51 AM.
    Worship the LORD, not HIS creation.

  12. #32
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  13. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by fox View Post
    The only thing worse than turkey hunters are trout fishermen.
    And, yes, you are correct.

  14. #34
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    Bit dog barks loudest.
    Worship the LORD, not HIS creation.

  15. #35
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    Thatís pretty obvious

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