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santee11
05-10-2010, 11:46 AM
Today is Confederate Memorial Day in South Carolina.

dixiedeerslaya
05-10-2010, 12:19 PM
:battle::battle::banger:

Tater
05-10-2010, 12:22 PM
Anderson DMV office is closed in observance of such :bigthumb:

ccleroy
05-10-2010, 12:49 PM
Anderson DMV office is closed in observance of such :bigthumb:

Thats Rank..........

http://media.nbcaugusta.com/images/wagt_sc_confederate_flag.jpg

Jozie & Me
05-10-2010, 01:07 PM
Happy Confederate Memorial Day in honor of my Great, Great Grandfather: Private, Co. D 1st Regiment Infantry, Co. C 18th Battalion, SC Artillery. (Pee Dee Rifles) Rest in Peace Grandpa Spence

dixiedeerslaya
05-10-2010, 01:32 PM
MY GREAT GREAT GRANDFATHER WAS THE LAST CONFEDERATE SOLDIER LIVING IN SOUTH CAROLINA... HE DIED IN 1952...

HERE IS A LITTLE INFO ON HIM...

On November 25th, 1952, the last Confederate Veteran of the Carolinas passed away. He was buried with military honors, on November 30th, at White House Methodist Church near Orangeburg, S. C. Pvt. Arnold Murray, Co. H, 11th South Carolina Infantry,
born on June 10, 1846, died November 25, 1952.
This is to announce that there will be a Memorial Service, to honor all soldiers who wore the Confederate uniform, on the fiftieth anniversary of Pvt. Murray's death. This service will be held at 2:30 P.M., December 1, 2002, at the cemetery of White House Church, one-half mile north (toward Santee) of the intersection of U.S. Highway 301 & I-26.
Fifty years ago, Pvt. Murray's funeral was attended by more than 5000 people, including Gov. James Byrnes and Sen. Strom Thurmond. Two years prior to Pvt. Murray's death, then Gov. Thurmond found out that he was the final veteran, at 104 years old, and appointed Farm Bureau executive, James Rogers to plan a funeral that was inevitable. Others who served on that committee were, Enock Smith, S. C. Commander of the Sons of Confederate Veterans and James Dozier, Adjutant General of South Carolina.
On behalf of the 5th Brigade of the South Carolina Division, I would like to invite you to attend and take part in this afternoon Memorial Service. I look forward to seeing you then.
Respectfully,
Irvin Shuler, 5th Brigade Commander
S. C. Division
Sons of Confederate Veterans



THERE ARE SOME COOL PICS ON THE SITE...
http://www.csa-scla.org/PhotoAlbum/02/02_12Orangeburg.htm

dixiedeerslaya
05-10-2010, 01:33 PM
Arnold Murray, 1846-1952 (http://scloshistorian.blogspot.com/2007/07/arnold-murray-1846-1952.html)


http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_gqeEEok-JeQ/Rp4P8SrRuSI/AAAAAAAAADM/oJ7YLXMNeAE/s320/Murray.jpg (http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_gqeEEok-JeQ/Rp4P8SrRuSI/AAAAAAAAADM/oJ7YLXMNeAE/s1600-h/Murray.jpg)On November 25, 1952 the Orangeburg Times & Democrat announced the death of one of South Carolina’s oldest citizens. He was just a retired farmer, a simple man, living in rural seclusion. Yet his passing was front-page news, his funeral a state occasion. Arnold Murray, age 106, was the state’s last Confederate veteran.

On his birthday, June 10 of that year, he was described by a local reporter as “cheerful and spry despite a [recent] heart attack.” Ladies of the United Daughters of the Confederacy sent greetings and several called in person. It had become common for him to receive visitors from the UDC, the Sons of Confederate Veterans, as well as the press. He lived in a three-room cabin in the White House section, cared for by his son. Two daughters also stayed in the area. His wife Laura had died in 1930. The recipient of a modest $60 per-month Confederate pension from the state, electricity had been installed in his little home as a gift of the Edisto Electric Cooperative. He enjoyed sitting on the porch, listening to his radio (with the help of a new hearing aid). The old gentleman had been deeply grieved when grandson Arnold L. Murray was killed in the Korean War. “I would rather go back,” the elder Murray was quoted as saying, “to the old times, if I could choose.”

Murray joined the Confederate army late in the war, as a teenager. “I volunteered and joined up when I was a youngster,” he remembered, “because my pa and brother was way up yonder somewhere in Virginia fighting.” He saw none of the action they did. Young Murray was in training on Sullivan’s Island when Charleston had to be evacuated. In weeks the war was over and he was headed home.

Private Murray saw no combat, but suffered the hardships common to Southern soldiers and civilians. In old age he came to represent those tens of thousands of South Carolinians who donned Confederate uniforms to defend their rights and their homes. When it became known to then-Governor Strom Thurmond that Murray was the last of the state’s Confederate veterans, a committee was formed. Discreetly, in consultation with the family but without the old soldier’s knowledge, plans were made to honor Murray at his passing. In memorializing him their aim was to remember all of the Palmetto State’s Confederate heroes.

The funeral was held at White House Methodist Church on Sunday afternoon, November 30. A procession followed the hearse to the church, ten miles outside of Orangeburg. The Highway Patrol estimated that between 5,000 and 6,000 crowded the grounds of the little house of worship, where loudspeakers had been set up for them to hear the service inside. Cars were parked ½ mile in both directions, overflowing into nearby fields. Two companies of local National Guard troops stood at attention as Citadel cadets fired a volley in salute. A Confederate flag flew at half-staff.

The casket was draped with a battle flag, the banner later presented to the family. Displayed also was the flag of the legendary Edisto Rifles, a local unit that marched to war in 1861. Governor James F. Byrnes led the mourners. Strom Thurmond was there, along with a host of other dignitaries. S. J. Latimer, editor of the State newspaper, was the main speaker. Arnold Murray, last of some 71,000 South Carolinians in Confederate service, was laid to rest just behind the church. He was, in Latimer’s words, “a good soldier, a respected citizen, an honorable man.”

Turd Ferguson
05-10-2010, 01:41 PM
http://i46.photobucket.com/albums/f145/beropalo/ALEXJBOURNEPRIVATEPIC.jpggreat grandfather, went in underage

justpracticin
05-10-2010, 01:44 PM
Gives me chills...

santee11
05-10-2010, 01:44 PM
Dang Dixie that is Cool.

santee11
05-10-2010, 01:49 PM
http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~scclaren/pictures/john.JPG
Joseph Newton Ridgeway 1829 - 1865 From Clarendon County. My GGG GrandFather. He Died in a Yankee prison Camp in up State New York, and is still up there. We don't know hard times!

I wish I could go get him and bring him home.

dixiedeerslaya
05-10-2010, 01:57 PM
gives me chills...


me too when i read that article!

Bass Attack
05-10-2010, 03:17 PM
Cool!

Rebel Yell
05-10-2010, 04:44 PM
I wish I could go get him and bring him home.

K, I'm up for a road trip. On the way back we can piss on linkum's and shermass's head stones. JAB said he would supply a bottle of "Rebel Yell"

Glenn
05-10-2010, 04:52 PM
I'll fuckin' drive.

Mobetter
05-10-2010, 05:26 PM
James Sevier McCarson. Born 27 Mar 1834, Hendersonville NC- Died 18 Dec 1862 Murfreesboro TN

My Great Grandmother's Grandfather.

muddman
05-10-2010, 06:27 PM
All good stuff! Happy Confederate Memorial Day!

Tater
05-10-2010, 06:30 PM
http://i46.photobucket.com/albums/f145/beropalo/ALEXJBOURNEPRIVATEPIC.jpggreat grandfather, went in underage
As in "Rad Dews"? :bigthumb:

Sportin' Woodies
05-10-2010, 08:36 PM
DAVID AUGUSTUS DICKERT: By Mac Wyckoff



David Augustus Dickert usually identified himself in writing as D. Augustus
Dickert although the family just called him "Gus." He was born on August 2,
1844, on a farm near the Broad River in the Dutch Fork section of what is
now Lexington County, South Carolina. He was the son of A.G. and Margaret
(Dickinson) Dickert. He had an older brother, James, a physician, who
served with Gus in the 3rd South Carolina and two other brothers and one
sister.

Dickert received very little formal education. He once described
his schooling as only lasting a few months and ended at age 12.

There is a discrepancy as to when he enlisted. Dickert wrote that he went
to Charleston to prepare defenses and implies that he participated in the
bombardment of Fort Sumter on April 12-13, 1861. Yet his compiled service
record at The National Archives shows that he enlisted the following day in
Dutch Fork over 100 miles away as 2ns sergeant of Company H, 3rd South
Carolina. A friend wrote that Dickert didn't join until June, 1861.

The regiment's first serious engagement occurred at Savage Station near
Richmond on June 29, 1862. A bullet ripped into his left lung creating a
"great gaping wound," the blood gushing and splattering out." Lying
semi-conscious on the ground, another bullet which he believed came from one
of his men by mistake struck him in the thigh. His brother, James, helped
him to the rear. Reaching a fallen tree, they stopped to examine the woods.
With his medical background, James determined the wound to be fatal, "a bit
of unpleasant information" for the patient. Later in the day, the fighting
physician examined the wounds again and assured his brother that his chances
of survival were good. He would survive this and three other serious wounds.

After a lengthy recovery period that caused him to miss Malvern Hill,
Maryland Heights and Antietam, Dickert returned by October 16th when he was
promoted to 2nd lieutenant. He was one of 166 members of the regiment to
be shot on Marye's Heights at Fredericksburg. The losses resulted in his
promotion to 1st lieutenant and several times in the spring and summer of
1863 he was acting company commander.

On the morning of September 20, 1863, he and his 22-year-old
brother, B. Fletcher Dickert, watched a beautiful sunrise. Gus thought it
rose "in unusual splendor, and cast its rays and shadows in sparkling
brilliancy over the mountains and plains of North Georgia." Getting ready
for combat, Fletcher wondered if they would see the sunrise again. It was
Fletcher's turn to cook rations, which would keep him out of the day's
battle. However, he asked Gus, his commanding officer, for permission to
exchange duties so he could take part in the fight. Contrary to
regulations, Dickert granted the request. As they went into battle,
Fletcher "faced the leaden storm with unparalleled indifference. Fletcher
was killed and Gus never forgave himself for allowing Fletcher to
participate that day.

The captain of Company H was so severely wounded at Chickamauga that he
never returned to active duty and Dickert acted as the company commander
although the promotion did not occur until April 4, 1864. Dickert was
wounded again near Knoxville, probably on November 18, 1863. By April, he
and returned and the command had re-joined General Robert E. Lee's army in
Central Virginia. While, at least one member of the 3rd South Carolina
found the natives of Lynchburg to be quite friendly, Dickert did not.
Dickert and Lieutenant John Watts picked a fight. A few weeks later,
Dickert was wounded at The Wilderness and sent to a hospital in Lynchburg.
One night when he was feeling better, Dickert went out to dinner with a
captain from Tennessee. While waiting for service, Dickert noticed the man
that he and Watts had attacked standing with a group of rowdies. The
stranger recognized Dickert about the same instant. The rowdy group moved
toward Dickert seeking revenge. The Tennessee captain threw the first punch
and then proceeded to take on the whole group before the fight was broken up.

Dickert returned from his Wilderness wound to participate in the important
fight at Cedar Creek on October 19, 1864. Lieutenant Colonel Rutherford
Todd was shot early in the battle and in the absence of the other field
officers Dickert commanded the regiment during that Confederate disaster.
After returning to Richmond, the regiment was sent to their native state to
stop general *******. While in Charleston, Dickert and Watts picked another
fight. The two small officers had previously agreed to "whip the first man
they ever met that they thought small enough to tackle." Finding such a man
in a saloon, they told him of their agreement and to take his medicine like
a man. The stranger said he didn't want to fight, but when the officers
persisted he agreed to their offer. A quick right to the jaw took care of
Watts, and a left to Dickert's stomach lifted him off the floor and set him
down among some barrels. The two officers got up, and said in unison, "We
are only in fun, don't strike anymore." The stranger agreed, "If you are
satisfied, I am. Come let's have a drink." As they left, they decided that
next time they would have to find a much smaller man. They later learned
that the stranger was a professional boxer.

After Lee surrendered his army at Appomattox, morale in the other
Confederate armies sunk. Dickert organized and led a group of about twenty
soldiers. He returned to his farm near Newberry. He took an active role in
helping his state recover from the war and joined the Ku Klux Klan.

Dickert married twice. His first wife, Katie Cromer, bore him two
sons and two daughters. A second marriage to Mary Alice Martin Coleman
produced a daughter. Despite his lack of formal education, he attained an
education through life experiences and substantial reading. He was a writer
and his knowledge of world military history is evident in his book, A
History of Kershaw's Brigade. Although this book contains numerous factual
errors (dates and places, etc.) and typo's, it is well written with abundant
interesting stories. By the time the book was written in the late 1890's,
the memories of Dickert and his comrades did not always prove reliable.
Without access to the information we have today, it is amazing that he was
able to compile as many facts as he did and write such a comprehensive book.
He also wrote stories for the newspaper and other publications. His best
known story is A Dance With Death. Dickert also studied the heavenly bodies
and was considered an expert at identifying stars.

On October 2, 1917, Dickert visited a friend. Although his health
had been failing for several years he was in good spirits and bragged about
being able to shoot straight. About 5:00 a.m. on October 5th, he had a heart
attack and died an hour later in his home. He is buried in Newberry's
Rosemont Cemetery..



my great great uncle. it would behoove anyone to read "A Dance With Death" if a copy could be located. it can be read in one or two sittings.

post war, he rode a horse into the second story of newberry's old court house. those inside meeting (northern sympathizers) were said to jump out of the second story windows.

Highstrung
05-10-2010, 08:43 PM
My avatar Gen. James Cantey - grandfathers side.


Birth: Dec. 30, 1818Death: Jun. 30, 1874http://s3.amazonaws.com/findagrave/icons2/trans.gif
Civil War Confederate Brigadier General. Born in Camden, South Carolina, he received a degree from South Carolina College, then studied law in Charleston and was admitted to the bar around 1834. He spent 2 terms in the state legislature, departing to enlist in the Palmetto Regiment during the Mexican War. Below the border he rose to Captain and was wounded in action, returning to settle on a plantation in Russell County, Alabama. When his state seceded, he was again in uniform, this time serving with the rank of Colonel in the 15th Alabama Infantry. The regiment was dispatched to Virginia, where it served under Major General Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson during the 1862 Shenandoah Valley Campaign. At First Winchester, the Alabamians helped repel a Federal advance and at Cross Keys, the last engagement of the campaign, he and his regiment, part of Brigadier General Isaac Trimble's brigade, held a position so advanced that Major General John C. Fremont's Federals nearly cut off the regiment from Trimble's main force. Later in the day, his men won praise for flanking Fremont's left, striking his rear, rolling up his line, and chasing his men westward. On January 8, 1863, he was appointed Brigadier General. Transferred to Mobile, he organized a brigade of 3 Alabama regiments and 1 from Mississippi, leading this command with much success early in the Atlanta Campaign of 1864. That May his troops defended strategic Resaca, Georgia, against some 15,000 Federals of the Army of the Tennessee, under Major General James B. McPherson. For a time that summer, he led a division, then reverted to brigade command in the Army of Mississippi. He was absent for much of the fighting around Atlanta but returned to the field to serve under General John B. Hood during Hood's foray into Tennessee. Early in 1865 he aided General Joseph E. Johnston in opposing *******'s invasion of the Carolinas. He saw his final battle at Bentonville, surrendering with Johnston 5 weeks later at Durham Station, North Carolina. Returning to his plantation, he resided in the Alabama hill country until his death


Grandmothers side - Col. William Shannon. Killed in the last legal duel of South Carolina.

Also the man whom where my name came from- Col. Ralph Nesbitt

The South Carolina 9th Infantry Battalion was formed during the summer of 1861 with men who had served in Col. Ralph Nesbit's Battalion State Troops. Col. Nesbit's family was one of the most successful rice plantation owners at Pawley's Island north of Charleston. Col. Nesbit ultimately spent the majority of the war serving with Col. Manigault in the Siege Train. The 9th was also known at the Pee Dee Legion or Pee Dee Rifles. Crute refers to them as the 9th Infantry Regiment. The rosters from the National Archives have listings for 7 companies (A - G). Sifakis states that the unit was formed March 24, 1862 with 7

ccleroy
05-10-2010, 08:44 PM
All Good Read's......

WNM
05-10-2010, 08:45 PM
...They later learned
that the stranger was a professional boxer...

:lol:

Turd Ferguson
05-10-2010, 08:58 PM
As in "Rad Dews"? :bigthumb: yep- how you know about radd dews- fencing or BBQ?

BigBrother
05-10-2010, 09:04 PM
K, I'm up for a road trip. On the way back we can piss on linkum's and shermass's head stones. JAB said he would supply a bottle of "Rebel Yell"

I am in.

Thank you all who served and lost so much.

BOGSTER
05-10-2010, 09:19 PM
Looks a little like Walt Ridgeway.


http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~scclaren/pictures/john.JPG
Joseph Newton Ridgeway 1829 - 1865 From Clarendon County. My GGG GrandFather. He Died in a Yankee prison Camp in up State New York, and is still up there. We don't know hard times!

I wish I could go get him and bring him home.

Sportin' Woodies
05-11-2010, 07:26 AM
looks a little like Nab with frat-wings.

ProvidenceSwamper
05-11-2010, 07:37 AM
I had the day off......caught 21 bass in the afternoon.

DDS I know Mr Irvin Shuler pretty well that wrote that. He lives up the road.
He came to our Civil War History class in High School and spoke. He also gave us a print of the State House with the Flag still on the dome.

Redleg
05-11-2010, 07:39 AM
This guy looks like a young MergieMaster!!!

http://i46.photobucket.com/albums/f145/beropalo/ALEXJBOURNEPRIVATEPIC.jpggreat grandfather, went in underage

santee11
05-11-2010, 07:58 AM
Murph, You think we need to get our passports to go get him or just screw it?

Redleg
05-11-2010, 08:08 AM
Grandmothers side - Col. William Shannon. Killed in the last legal duel of South Carolina.



Highstrung, My wife's greatx3 grandfather was Col. Cash, who killed Col. Shannon in the last legal duel of South Carolina. We used his saber to cut our wedding cake.

Whaler_Dave
05-11-2010, 08:11 AM
Some of you fellas have some awesome family history! Something to be very damn proud off!!

millero
05-11-2010, 08:19 AM
Highstrung, My wife's greatx3 grandfather was Col. Cash, who killed Col. Shannon in the last legal duel of South Carolina. We used his saber to cut our wedding cake.

That's cool. Not that one killed the other, but the odds of yall being related to the guys that had the duel.

Tater
05-11-2010, 08:32 AM
yep- how you know about radd dews- fencing or BBQ?
BBQ.

LowcountryBuck
05-11-2010, 08:33 AM
Highstrung, My wife's greatx3 grandfather was Col. Cash, who killed Col. Shannon in the last legal duel of South Carolina. We used his saber to cut our wedding cake.

Redleg, your wife and I must be related as Col Cash was my relative as well, I believe Great great great grandfather also...

We have a plaque at my grandmother's house detailing the duel.

Pretty cool, would like to see the saber some day-

Highstrung
05-11-2010, 09:34 AM
Looks like I'm going to have to challange one of ya'll. Meet at Lycnhes river at noon on Thursday, and I'll have my second with me. I'm just picking. I have some of his things also. My mother is a huge history buff, and she got me into it at a young age. It's funny how the entire thing happened. Good men whom served our state and turned on each other. I won't say anything about ya'lls mother-in-law either(the duel).

Redleg
05-11-2010, 09:38 AM
Here's an article from the July 11, 1880 NY Times about the duel. Pretty cool find.

http://query.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=9F00E6DE143FEE3ABC4952DFB166838B 699FDE

FHF
05-11-2010, 09:39 AM
Great, Great, Great Grandfather B.M. Badger --- Company K, Third SC Calvary

Redleg
05-11-2010, 09:47 AM
Looks like I'm going to have to challange one of ya'll. Meet at Lycnhes river at noon on Thursday, and I'll have my second with me. I'm just picking. I have some of his things also. My mother is a huge history buff, and she got me into it at a young age. It's funny how the entire thing happened. Good men whom served our state and turned on each other. I won't say anything about ya'lls mother-in-law either(the duel).

Doc Holliday: "I know, let's have a spelling contest!"

All the literature about the duel makes Col. Cash look like a pussy, but during the war he was pretty wild. I've read some accounts of his actions at First Manassas when he was a Regimental Commander. Lots of folks from Washington packed picnic lunches and came out to watch the battle. He was over on the sidelines threatening to kill a group of US Senators with his saber when his Regimental Sergeant Major came over and had to drag him away.

Redleg
05-11-2010, 09:48 AM
LCB, HS - I think my mother in law has Col. Cash's pistol from the duel as well.

Highstrung
05-11-2010, 09:48 AM
There are a few things around Camden that you can find that came about from that duel. That's how the iron-man came about. Gentlemen would fire at him instead of each other. There are a few articles in local books that have some good readings on it.

Highstrung
05-11-2010, 09:49 AM
Doc Holliday: "I know, let's have a spelling contest!"

All the literature about the duel makes Col. Cash look like a pussy, but during the war he was pretty wild. I've read some accounts of his actions at First Manassas when he was a Regimental Commander. Lots of folks from Washington packed picnic lunches and came out to watch the battle. He was over on the sidelines threatening to kill a group of US Senators with his saber when his Regimental Sergeant Major came over and had to drag him away.

They all seem a little biased to me also. (I'm sorry about the spelling. I had a customer come in, and I was writing fast.)

BigBrother
05-11-2010, 09:52 AM
Here's an article from the July 11, 1880 NY Times about the duel. Pretty cool find.

http://query.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=9F00E6DE143FEE3ABC4952DFB166838B 699FDE

Small wonder that glowing recount appeared in that rag.

I really hate a yankee.

buzzards luck
05-11-2010, 10:03 AM
http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~scclaren/pictures/john.JPG
Joseph Newton Ridgeway 1829 - 1865 From Clarendon County. My GGG GrandFather. He Died in a Yankee prison Camp in up State New York, and is still up there. We don't know hard times!

I wish I could go get him and bring him home.


Joseph Newton Ridgeway is one of my ancestors too. Shoot me a pm I am interested in fining out who you are.

badfaulkner
05-11-2010, 11:25 AM
DAVID AUGUSTUS DICKERT: By Mac Wyckoff

...

David Augustus Dickert usually identified himself in writing as D. Augustus
Dickert although the family just called him "Gus."...


.....my great great uncle. it would behoove anyone to read "A Dance With Death" if a copy could be located. it can be read in one or two sittings.

post war, he rode a horse into the second story of newberry's old court house. those inside meeting (northern sympathizers) were said to jump out of the second story windows.

http://www.researchonline.net/catalog/06001.htm

Good stuff. Thanks for sharing, sportin'.

Rebel Yell
05-11-2010, 11:36 AM
Murph, You think we need to get our passports to go get him or just screw it?

fuck 'em, we'll go in ninjer style all covert like, once the mission is accomplished we''ll ride out guns a blazin'......

santee11
05-11-2010, 11:40 AM
I'm in. We can take the back roads home. That way we can drink beer.

Rebel Yell
05-11-2010, 11:49 AM
that'll work, Glenn has a camper shell on his truck. we can ride in the back, we'll cut a hole in the bed so we can piss on the road and not have to stop

santee11
05-11-2010, 11:52 AM
Ha Ha

cudexter
05-11-2010, 12:37 PM
Awesome stories.

The word is stonewall Jackson through a winding family tree According to my grandmother. I'll take it.

I love civil war history

LowcountryBuck
05-11-2010, 01:23 PM
LCB, HS - I think my mother in law has Col. Cash's pistol from the duel as well.
man that would be awesome to see...where are u located? I am in Hilton Head, but grew up in Spartanburg-PM me

BoykinLvr
05-11-2010, 02:04 PM
My ggggf PVT Anderson Walls, Company I, 24th SC Volunteers, from Edgefield, during Hood's frontal assault against entrenched Yankees in front of Franklin, TN, he and his brother-in-law were wounded in the shoulder after he wrested away the colors of the 97th Ohio Infantry in hand-to-hand combat in the trenches- they had no ammunition when they charged the trench lines. He and his brother-in-law returned to their company on Christmas Eve following the debacle at Nashville and served to the end of the war, then after the war was elected by the veterans of the 24th to return the colors to the survivors of the 97th Ohio in Zanesville, OH in 1885 in a gesture of friendship coordinated by their Brigade Commander Ellison Capers.

My other ggggf Oliver Towles, 5th Color Sergeant, Company K, 14th SC Volunteers, also from Edgefield, was in Pender's Brigade and was severely wounded in the leg on July 1, 1863 at Gettysburg. All 5 color bearers were killed or wounded as they assaulted the stone fence held by Doubleday's Division. Towles was badly wounded and "left in the hands of the enemy" and was sent to Johnson's Island as a POW until released in 1865. He survived the war but lost his leg eventually as a result of his wounds.
They both returned to Edgefield to their families to face devastated farms. They simply rebuilt their burned homes, replanted their fields and did what they had to do to provide for their families. No help from the government, no hand outs. They just went back to work.

Geetch
05-11-2010, 02:26 PM
Did anyone's ancestors not take the loyalty oath after the war?

Jozie & Me
05-11-2010, 03:15 PM
Grandpa Spence along with the whole Pee Dee rifles company did not surrender, nor did they surrender their flag. They surrendered their cannon outside of Greensboro, NC and left the night before they were to surrender. The guide-on bearer concealed the flag in his clothes and they walked back to SC and returned it to the lady in Society Hill that made it. They flew the flag on July 21 every year at the reunions until 1905 when it was presented to the Governor after saying "In your hands I give this flag, it has never felt the touch of hostile hands."

Here is a video history of the flag.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mgC36W6KcrA

I had always heard the story of how Grandpa Spence had carried a wounded soldier over a mile from the battle of Chancellorsville. The man had shown up at Grandpa Spence's funeral and gave a eulogy.

In 2006 my dad got a call from a lady stating that she was the granddaughter of that man, and wanted to meet with us to thank our family. I had the priviledge to go with my mom and dad to see the flag and meet Mrs Napier and her family.

here is a link to the story from the Beaufort Gazette as reported by AP.

http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1998&dat=20060425&id=H44iAAAAIBAJ&sjid=QKoFAAAAIBAJ&pg=1093,7832134

I was really cool to have history come alive and meet other families whom were touched by common events. We have some cool pictures as well.

santee11
05-11-2010, 04:05 PM
I wonder if any of those boys that went off to fight ever said I am going off to die for my State so black people can't be free? When people say that the Civil War was about Slavery it just drives my crazy. I had a lot of GGGrandfathers, GGGUncles, cousins and so forth that faught and none that I know of owned any slaves. You can't tell me that they would have done what they did to keep men from being free. It was a great example of a rich mans war and a poor mans fight.

Sportin' Woodies
07-05-2010, 06:27 PM
just read of the duel that redleg and others were speaking about in the book my ggguncle wrote, A History of Kershaw's Brigade.

thought you might want to here of Cash's character, from one of his "comrades" as he regularly refers.

Ellerbe Boggan Crawford Cash was born newar Wadesboro, Anson COunty, NC, on July 1, 1823. His father was Boggan Cash, a Col in militia of that State, merchant, and member of Legislature. His mother was MIss Elizabeth Ellerbe, of CHesterfield County, SC. He was the only child. His father died when he was near 2 years old, and his mother returned to her father's, in SC. He was educated at Mt. Zion Institute, Winnsboro, SC, and SC college. He read Law under General Blakeney, at CHeraw, SC and practiced in partnership a short while with Alexander McIver, Esq, the SOlicitor of the Eastern Circuit, and father of Chief Justice Henry McIver, of SC. But his mother owning a large landed estate, and several hundred negroes, he soon retired from the Bar to look after her affairs, and evoted himself to planting and raising fine horses and cattle. He married in 1847 his cousin, Miss Allan Ellerbe, of Kershaw, SC. He was elected to the LEgislature from his COunty, Chesterfield. He was elected Colonel, Brig General and Major General of State militia.
When the war commenced he was one of the Major Generals of the State. He volunteered and was elected Col of the 8th SC regiment. At the reorganization he did not offer for re election, but came home and was made Col in State troops. He was kind to the poor the whole war, and gave away during the war over 50,000 bushels of corn, and large quantities of other provisions to soldiers' families, or sold it in Confederate money at ante bellum prices. After the war all notes, claims, and mortgages he held on estates of old soldiers he cancelled and made a present of them to their families. In one case the amount he gave a widow, who had a family and small children, was over $5,000, her husband having been killed in his regiment.
After the war he continued to farm. In 1876 he took and active part in redeeming the State, and contributed his time, advice, and services, and a great deal of money. In 1881 he fought a duel with Col Wm. M. Shannon, in which he killed Col Shannon. Col Cash was the challenged party. His wife died in May, 1880. Col Cash died March 10, 1888, and was buried in the family burying ground at his residence, Cash's Depot, SC.
Col Cash was a man of strong character, fearless, brave, generous, and true, a good friend and patriot. He made no religious profession. He was charitable to the extreme, and was the soul of honor, and while he had many enemies, being a fearless man and a good hater, he had such qualities as inspired the respect and admiration of his fellowmen.

-D. Augustus Dickert

Highstrung
07-05-2010, 07:20 PM
Son-of-a killed my great-great-great uncle and this is what I get. I can see his house out of my window now. Hey, Redleg just having fun.

SCLAND&TIMBER
07-05-2010, 09:03 PM
I've seen the historical marker plenty of times and even read about the duel several times but learned a few things in this article. Most notably that Cash's son was later killed by a Chesterfield County posse after he had killed a law officer. Has their been a reunion yet?

http://www.leatherneck.com/forums/showthread.php?t=20935

duckduckdog
09-04-2013, 07:37 AM
Been doing a little research - my GG Grandfather, Peter Crawford was in the Artillery Unit at the battle of Secessionville. My GGG Granfather, Levi Crawford was in the Calvary Unit - The St. James Riflemen to be exact.

squatty
09-04-2013, 07:55 AM
Arnold Murray, 1846-1952 (http://scloshistorian.blogspot.com/2007/07/arnold-murray-1846-1952.html)


http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_gqeEEok-JeQ/Rp4P8SrRuSI/AAAAAAAAADM/oJ7YLXMNeAE/s320/Murray.jpg (http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_gqeEEok-JeQ/Rp4P8SrRuSI/AAAAAAAAADM/oJ7YLXMNeAE/s1600-h/Murray.jpg)On November 25, 1952 the Orangeburg Times & Democrat announced the death of one of South Carolina’s oldest citizens. He was just a retired farmer, a simple man, living in rural seclusion. Yet his passing was front-page news, his funeral a state occasion. Arnold Murray, age 106, was the state’s last Confederate veteran.

On his birthday, June 10 of that year, he was described by a local reporter as “cheerful and spry despite a [recent] heart attack.” Ladies of the United Daughters of the Confederacy sent greetings and several called in person. It had become common for him to receive visitors from the UDC, the Sons of Confederate Veterans, as well as the press. He lived in a three-room cabin in the White House section, cared for by his son. Two daughters also stayed in the area. His wife Laura had died in 1930. The recipient of a modest $60 per-month Confederate pension from the state, electricity had been installed in his little home as a gift of the Edisto Electric Cooperative. He enjoyed sitting on the porch, listening to his radio (with the help of a new hearing aid). The old gentleman had been deeply grieved when grandson Arnold L. Murray was killed in the Korean War. “I would rather go back,” the elder Murray was quoted as saying, “to the old times, if I could choose.”

Murray joined the Confederate army late in the war, as a teenager. “I volunteered and joined up when I was a youngster,” he remembered, “because my pa and brother was way up yonder somewhere in Virginia fighting.” He saw none of the action they did. Young Murray was in training on Sullivan’s Island when Charleston had to be evacuated. In weeks the war was over and he was headed home.

Private Murray saw no combat, but suffered the hardships common to Southern soldiers and civilians. In old age he came to represent those tens of thousands of South Carolinians who donned Confederate uniforms to defend their rights and their homes. When it became known to then-Governor Strom Thurmond that Murray was the last of the state’s Confederate veterans, a committee was formed. Discreetly, in consultation with the family but without the old soldier’s knowledge, plans were made to honor Murray at his passing. In memorializing him their aim was to remember all of the Palmetto State’s Confederate heroes.

The funeral was held at White House Methodist Church on Sunday afternoon, November 30. A procession followed the hearse to the church, ten miles outside of Orangeburg. The Highway Patrol estimated that between 5,000 and 6,000 crowded the grounds of the little house of worship, where loudspeakers had been set up for them to hear the service inside. Cars were parked ½ mile in both directions, overflowing into nearby fields. Two companies of local National Guard troops stood at attention as Citadel cadets fired a volley in salute. A Confederate flag flew at half-staff.

The casket was draped with a battle flag, the banner later presented to the family. Displayed also was the flag of the legendary Edisto Rifles, a local unit that marched to war in 1861. Governor James F. Byrnes led the mourners. Strom Thurmond was there, along with a host of other dignitaries. S. J. Latimer, editor of the State newspaper, was the main speaker. Arnold Murray, last of some 71,000 South Carolinians in Confederate service, was laid to rest just behind the church. He was, in Latimer’s words, “a good soldier, a respected citizen, an honorable man.”


WOW!!!

God Speed Sir!!

M.R.Ducks
09-04-2013, 12:04 PM
Did anyone's ancestors not take the loyalty oath after the war?

Yes. My GGGgrandfather did. He was a prisoner of war in Harts island NY. He took it 5 days after the war officially ended.

Highstrung
09-04-2013, 12:15 PM
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The Cash-ähannou Duel.
A COLD-BLOODED MURDER OIST THE
"FIELD OP HONOR."
Camden, July 9.-As the details of the
duel between Col. E. B. C. Cash and Col.
William M. Shannon are gradually made pub-Fix this text
lic, the conviction is forced upon the popular
. mind that Col. Shannon was made the victim
ô|, a most outrageous conspiracy, and that
Col, Cash and his son hounded him with the
express purpose of murdering the old man in
cold blood. The duel was not private, as was
at first supposed, bat was witnessed by quite
a number of persons, who were invited to the
field by Col. Cash to " see the sport." Sorae
of these men, shocked by the brutality of the
two Cashes, father and son, are telling the
story in all its terrible details, and many of
them denounce the murderer of Shannon in
unmeasured terms. Both the principals to
the duel were in what is known as the
" Lydsa Section," a thickly settled community,
for six hours before the meeting took place.
The object of their being there was well
known to scores of people, yet-no effort to
arrest them or to stop the duel, rumours of
which were in everybody's mouth, was made
by the authorities. One of the moat cold-
blooded of the incidents preceding the meet-
ing took place in the yard of Dr. Leo, who
who accompanied Cash as his second. Por
several hours before the duel, Col. Cash was
practising with his pistol to make sure of hiB
aim on the field. Por this purpose he made
^nse of his hopeful son, W. B. Cash, os a tar-
get. This worthy representative of Southern
chivalry was placed in position, 15 paces
the distance between the principals in the
duel-from his father, who fired at him with
paper wads until he was able to strike the
same spot six times in succession. When he
left Dr, Lee's yard, after practising on his
human target, he was tolerably sure of the
steadiness of his eye and his nerves. The
affair was conducted according to the code of
honor, and regular dueling pistols were used.
The sons of both principals were in the field,
and each, it is said, was pledged to take up
the father's quarrel should he fall. Young
Cash stood among the spectators, who were
not allowed to approach very"*closely, and
watched the duel through an opera-glass.
When Shannon fell he expressed great joy,
and disgusted- even his friends by his brutal
comments on the result.
The correspondence passing between the
parties is now published, and it places Col.
Cash and his son in a very unenviable light.
There is no doubt that the murder of Shan-
non was determined on from the outset, and
when Ellerbee failed, to lure bim to the fatal
field, Cash and his son took the matter in
hand with cold-blooded deliberation. The
first letter was written by Col. Cash Nov. 24,
3
1879. He alludes to the charges of fraud
made against Mrs. Cash in the court pro-
ceedings, and says that he is induced to hope
that the charge was not made with Col.
Shannon's approval. To this Col. Shannon
replied in a frank, manly letter, denying that
ho had ever charged Mrs. CaBh with fraud as
her husband understood the word, and on
the receipt of this, Cash, in a letter dated
Dec. 1, 1879, asknowledged himself satis-
fied, and expressed himself " truly happy "
to know that there was no cause for
any change in the friendly relations that
bad existed between the two men. Then,
followed the challenge by Ellerbee, which
Shannon declined, and the insulting letter in
which Ellerbee stamped him as " a paltroon
and coward." This correspondence was
printed in a circular, and scattered about
Camden. On the back of the circular waa
one of the most insulting cards referring to
Shannon, and signed, "With the complimenta
of W. B. Cash," that ever issued from tha
pen of a blackguard and ruflUn. It waa
headed " Camden Soliloquies," and repre-
sented Col. Shannon as soliloquizing over the
exposure of his cowardice, and confessing him-
self the embodiment of meanness, and closed
with some verses of reprobation, of which tlje
old gentleman's dead father was the subject.
No reputable Northern journal would
defile its columns with this production,
and I only enclose a shor<¡ extract as a speci-
men of this choice bit of Southern literatura :
-" It may be I am not bad blood after all.. I
am sometimes afraid it is my own meanness
that makes me weak. I let my dariïng boy
risk his life for me, and then this bridge busi-
ness is a sore to me. I am afraid the people
don't know how honest I am. Then 1 have
cheated widows and orphans and my own sis-
ter out of all she had-took her toy clock,
and put her out to the highest bidder ; but,
after all, a fellow muBt live, and is worse
than an infidel if he dont provide for his own
family. I shall now join old Wilson's Anti
Duelling Society, and I think I ought to be
first President."
Smarting under the infliction of this vile
insult, Col. Shannon wrote to Cash on June
11, referring to the unmerited approbrium
thus cast upon him by the latter's son, and
recalling the previous correspondence, in
which he had disclaimed all intentional rude-
ness toward Mrs. Cash. In that letter he
wroje : " I ask to recall to your attention the
factHthat I held myself responsiblejn that
correspondence for all that I had done, and I
now add that I hold myself responsible to
you for all the fake positions you and yours
have seen fit to assign me." Cash replied
June 15, in a long letter charging Shannon
with falsehood in the previous correspondence.
In this leter he says :-" You refused to fight
Mr. Elerbree, and the fact that you have
been advertised as a poltroon and a coward
by a man who is your superior by birth
and in all the essentials and characteristics
that constitute an honorable man, places you
beyond the recognition of those who wish to
be regarded as gentlemen. The position has
been assumed by some that a gentleman may,
if challenged, fight his boot-black,;and the
good opinion I once had of you, and the
inborn Bympathy I posBesB for those in dis-
tress, prompts me to adopt (for the present)
that position toward you, and I think I have
given you in this note ample and sufficient
grounds to justify you in taking action
against me, and should you determine to act
on my suggestion, allow me to assure you
that no friend of mine will meanly resort to
the law to punish you for sending me ft
challenge. Nor will I attempt to array
public opinion against you by claiming that
you have placed me in a false position."
The same mail carried a letter from young
Cash, in which he covered the old man with
insulting epithets, and concluded : " Aside
from your recent disgraceful conduct, the
great disparity in our ages prevents nfli going
upon you ; but if there is any of your blood
who would like to espouse your infamous
cause, I am ready, and will gladly meelXthem.
at any time and place that will be mutually
convenient." Upon the receipt of these
letters Col. Shannon at once appointed his
second, and the duel of the 5th instant was
arranged.
Charleston, S. C, July 12.-Col. Cash, the
surviving principal in the recent fatal duel,
was arrested thiB afternoon by the sheriff of
Chesterfield County, on a warrant from the
coroner of Kershaw county, charging him
with the killing of Col. Shannon. Col. Cash
has been awaiting arrest at his home since
the duel, and expresses his readiness for trial.
He will be tried in Darlington county, the
scene of the duel.
Charleston, S, C, July 17.-Colonel Cash,
the surviving principal in the recent fatal
duel, came before Judge Mciver, of the State
Supreme Court, at Cheraw, last evening;Jon
a, writ of habeas corpus, and was admitted to
bail in the sum of 3,000 dois. Considerable
excitement waa occasioned in Cheraw previous
to the hearing of the application by au attack
made by a son of Colonial Cash upon Mr.
Pegues, the editor of the Cheraw Su7t, who
had denounced the duel in his paper.
Young Cash aud his father had both drawn
their pistols, the latter avowing his intention
to see a fair fight, and Mr. Pegues^was only
saved by being thrust by his fnendB%into an
open doorway, where he waa l

Highstrung
09-04-2013, 12:17 PM
Ugh, that was messy.

Highstrung
09-04-2013, 12:22 PM
Hey Z..

Highstrung
09-04-2013, 12:22 PM
While many of us are familiar with duels from old movies, when men stand back to back, walk twenty paces, and then turn and fire at each other, this was once a common practice right here in Camden. Dueling began in colonial times and was at one time an accepted way for men to protect their honor, social status, and manhood from any threat, whether real or perceived. Here are details about some of the duels that took place right here in Kershaw County.

• Jacob Brown and Thomas Baker, May 1789. Jacob Brown, one of Camden’s early attorneys, swore out a peace warrant against Thomas Baker, who apparently had a reputation for violent behavior. Baker responded with a challenge, and the two men met a Camden’s racecourse (in the vicinity of present-day Hampton Park). Beginning with their backs to each other, each took five steps, turned and fired. Both men were dead by that evening.
• Timothy Spann and a Mr. Lavall, April 1812. Though the details leading to the duel are not known, Spann had shot Lavall during the duel, hitting him in the hip. According to Kirkland and Kennedy’s Historic Camden, as Lavall was falling to the ground, Spann “made some exulting exclamation, whereupon Lavall fired and hit Spann in the forehead, killing him instantly.” This incident took place just a few miles below Camden.
• Henry G. Nixon and Thomas A. Hopkins, January 1829. Although this duel took place near Augusta, both men were from Camden. This duel appears to have had its roots in a lawsuit filed some five years earlier by Hopkins’ mother against Nixon’s father, over a valuable tract of land. Henry Nixon and Thomas Hopkins, then, were well acquainted and may have also been rivals for military honors. Tradition says that one of the participants, some say Nixon and others say Hopkins, practiced their shooting in Quaker Cemetery, on the 1822 tombstone of Neil Smith. Nixon was shot in the chest and died almost instantly, while his own pistol went off harmlessly. Hopkins, however, died some three years later, apparently overcome with grief over the incident.
• James P. Dickinson and John Smart, 1845. Although the details of this duel are not known, legend says that Dickinson had an iron man made, on which he could practice shooting. The iron was purchased from a store on the corner of York and Broad Streets, and the figure was made to resemble Smart’s side view. Smart and Dickinson met in the vicinity of Lugoff and fired at each other; both missed. Both men were known for their marksmanship, and speculation arose that their seconds (or assistants) on the field had not loaded their pistols with real ammunition. After the duel, the iron man was supposedly dumped into Factory Pond (today Kendall Lake); it was recovered years later when the pond was drained to repair the floodgates.
• S. Miller Williams and Boggan Cash, August 1878. This duel arose over a dispute over a horse. Nobody was hurt.
• James Cantey and Boggan Cash, December 1878. This duel took place in Darlington County, but the participants were from this area. This duel was the result of remarks believed to have been made by Cash about Cantey’s uncle. Even though Cantey received a bullet through his waistcoat, nobody was injured.
• Charles J. Shannon and T.H. Clarke, August 1879. This incident arose over offensive accusations made by Clarke against Shannon’s father in connection with the finances of the old Wateree River Bridge. The duel took place just north of Hobkirk Hill; nobody was hurt.
• William M. Shannon and E.B.C. Cash, 1880. This incident began over a lawsuit involving Cash’s brother-in-law, in which Shannon acted as one of the attorneys. A perceived accusation of fraud was made by Shannon against Cash’s wife, and even though the men appeared to have settled the matter in the fall of 1879, resentments and bad feelings continued to fester until June 1880. The two men met in Darlington County on July 5. While Cash was not injured, Shannon was killed. Public outrage over his death made this the last duel fought in South Carolina.

Public sentiment against dueling had surfaced many times prior to the Cash-Shannon duel, even leading to the formation of the Camden Anti-Dueling Society following the Shannon-Clarke duel in 1879. A similar society had been formed after Henry G. Nixon had been killed in 1829, but it took the death of William M. Shannon to turn the public against the practice for good. In fact, a provision was added to the State Constitution in 1895, disqualifying from public office any person who had participated in a duel as principal, second, or otherwise, since January 1, 1881. Of course, the end of the practice of dueling did nothing to end violence in the state, but the rituals, courtesies, and mannerly way in which men undertook trying to kill each other ended forever.

Highstrung
09-04-2013, 12:23 PM
Damn, my family shot at a lot of people.

Redleg
09-04-2013, 12:46 PM
Hey Z..


Sir yes Sir...

Jozie & Me
09-04-2013, 12:52 PM
Did anyone's ancestors not take the loyalty oath after the war?

Grandpa Spence nor any of the Pee Dee Rifles took it. The night before they were to surrender their guns in Greensboro, they scuttled their cannon and slipped out of camp and walked back to Florence. The Standard Bearer hid the unit flag inside the lining of his coat. The ultimate plan was to join up with a group in Texas that was continuing the fight (so they had heard.) That obviously didnt materialize.

They used to have reunions on July 21 ever year and flew the flag.

In 1903 it was presented to the Governor of SC having never been touched by hostile hands.



Years later his nephew came by the house to say goodbye headed off to the Spanish American war. Grandpa Spence was old then, and would not let him in the yard in uniform. He had to go change and come back in civies.

Shotunderit
09-04-2013, 10:52 PM
Good for these men. People of this ilk were referred to as "unreconstructed".